The Daily Challenge: Are you mirroring others' behavior?

 

Mirroring is more than simply mimicking some else's body language.

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Mirroring.

Time to Read: 3 Mins

With a foundation of building trust and camaraderie, you can use mirroring to give an outward display of your internal intentions.

Mirroring shows empathy, a desire to understand someone else, to join them in a mutual experience, and to develop a bond and trust.

This week, try out each technique below in your communication with someone at work over the next few days. Then answer the questions below to discuss with your coach.

Note: Avoid mirroring drama, anger or negative situations. It may be best to try active listening here instead.

Technique 1: Match someone’s tone or emotions - After someone talks to you, consider their tone of voice.

  • Is their tone energetic, lethargic or monotone?

  • Do they seem happy, excited or complacent?

Try to match their tone or emotion. The easiest way to do this is in the morning. When you walk in to your office and someone energetically says “Good morning! How are you?” Slap a big smile on, stop, and actually talk to them about your morning.

If someone just nods at you or says hey, they might still need their coffee. Simply nod back, don’t take it personally. 


Technique 2: Mimic their body language - During a conversation, if someone is super engaged, leaning in and talking with their hands, do the same. If someone is talking to you and smiling don't look around and yawn. Nod, and smile back.  

Technique 3: Use their language - Some offices or teams already have a pretty cohesive shared language, but maybe there are people who describe things a certain way or use different words. As an example, if someone has a catchphrase “teamwork makes the dream work” - use it. Not facetiously, but honestly.

If someone is more casual in their language don’t push them away by being more formal, instead, mirror their language. If they say “Hey, what’s up” respond with “doing good, you?” not “I am quite well, thank you. How are you doing?



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